Binge-Worthy #5½: I Need A Ride To California (Morris Engel, 1968)

On the heels of The Little Fugitive, we take a look at Morris Engel’s long-lost, recently restored 1968 feature film, which chronicles the experiences of a free-spirited young woman immersed in the East Village counterculture scene.

Binge-Worthy #5: The Little Fugitive (Morris Engel and Ruth Orkin, 1953)

At the start of the 1950s, Photo League members Morris Engel and Ruth Orkin made a low-budget independent feature called The Little Fugitive using a small, custom-built portable 35mm camera. Their unassuming and charming debut as filmmakers went on to have an unexpected and considerable influence on the film world.

Book Review: Fotoclubismo by Sarah Hermanson Meister

A beautifully printed, densely informative catalog that accompanies the current MoMA exhibit (on view through September), Fotoclubismo highlights the visually innovative photography of a largely unknown mid-20th Century amateur photography club in Brazil.

Binge-Worthy #1: Manhatta (Paul Strand and Charles Sheeler, 1921)

A semi-forgotten gem that MoMA cites as the first American avant-garde film, Manhatta was co-directed by Paul Strand, one of the most influential photographers of the early 20th Century. His co-director was the highly accomplished Charles Sheeler, a classically trained painter and self-taught photographer who came up with the initial concept for the film.

Book Review: Photography Until Now by John Szarkowski

Photography Until Now traces a path through the first 150 years of photography. The book, which blends history and criticism in insightful ways, is a sort of companion piece to Beaumont Newhall’s landmark 1937 MoMA exhibition and accompanying book The History of Photography.