Binge-Worthy #9: Another Day In Paradise (Larry Clark, 1998)

Larry Clark’s second feature film portrays the highs and lows of life on the margins from an insider’s perspective.

Book Review: Recreation by Mitch Epstein

In this newly revised and expanded edition of Recreation, Mitch Epstein brings focus to life’s in-between moments while chronicling Americans’ pursuit of leisure across several decades.

Binge-Worthy #8: Stranded In Canton (William Eggleston, 1974/2005)

William Eggleston’s lone foray into filmmaking, Stranded in Canton is an understated, unassuming, and unforgettable Southern Gothic masterpiece.

Binge-Worthy #5½: I Need A Ride To California (Morris Engel, 1968)

On the heels of The Little Fugitive, we take a look at Morris Engel’s long-lost, recently restored 1968 feature film, which chronicles the experiences of a free-spirited young woman immersed in the East Village counterculture scene.

Binge-Worthy #5: The Little Fugitive (Morris Engel and Ruth Orkin, 1953)

At the start of the 1950s, Photo League members Morris Engel and Ruth Orkin made a low-budget independent feature called The Little Fugitive using a small, custom-built portable 35mm camera. Their unassuming and charming debut as filmmakers went on to have an unexpected and considerable influence on the film world.

Binge-Worthy #4: In The Street (Helen Levitt, 1948)

In the Street is a sensitively observed slice-of-life portrait of Spanish Harlem shot in 1948 and released in the early 1950s. Acclaimed street photographer Helen Levitt collaborated on the film with her sister-in-law, painter Janice Loeb, and author James Agee, who wrote the text for Now Let Us Praise Famous Men.