New and Notable Photobooks: Some Say Ice by Alessandra Sanguinetti

In her latest monograph. Alessandra Sanguinetti crafts a kind of spiritual sequel to Michael Lesy’s cult classic, Wisconsin Death Trip. The result is one of the best photobooks of the year.

New and Notable Photobooks: Speedway 1972 by Henry Horenstein

Centered around the sport of modified stock car racing, Horenstein’s new monograph comprises a fascinating look at a subculture as it existed half a century ago.

New and Notable Photobooks: Recreation by Mitch Epstein

In this newly revised and expanded edition of Recreation, Mitch Epstein brings focus to life’s in-between moments while chronicling Americans’ pursuit of leisure across several decades.

Book Review: The Way It Was by Thomas Hoepker

This beautifully printed monograph revisits America in the early 1960s and draws a throughline to the early days of the pandemic. In the process, a master photographer rediscovers and builds on a body of work from his formative years.

Book Review: i saw the air fly by Sirkhane Darkroom

Uplifting and inspiring, i saw the air fly showcases the work of a photography program for child refugees located just across the border from Syria.

Book Review: Ruth Orkin – A Photo Spirit

Ruth Orkin: A Photo Spirit reproduces over 200 of Orkin’s photographs in honor of what would have been her 100th birthday. It’s the most definitive collection of her work to date.

Book Review: Yamabito, the Mountain People by Osamu Sato

In the 1970s, an unassuming Tokyo salaryman used his one day off each week to journey into the mountains of Gunma Prefecture, an 8×10” view camera in tow. Leaving the city behind, he trekked—first by train, then by bus, and finally on foot—until he arrived at the remote villages there.

Book Review: Palante: Young Lords Party by Michael Abramson with the Young Lords Party

Inspired by the Black Panthers, the Young Lords Party was an organization of Puerto Rican activists and community organizers, many of whom were first-generation college students at the time. The movement’s heyday lasted a little under two years, from 1969 to 1971. During that time, its members were on the frontlines of the struggle for social, racial, and economic justice.